Preparing To Ship A Car

What if my vehicle is inoperable?

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We can still probably ship your vehicle even if it is inoperable. There is an additional fee for vehicles that are inoperable. This fee is to compensate the carrier for the extra service performed by the driver during the loading and unloading process. Although we can probably still ship your vehicle, our definition of inoperable can be different than an auction house or other business you’re buying the automobile from so take a look at some of the criteria we take into account.

Is your vehicle an INOP?

Your vehicle may be considered inoperable for the purpose of shipping if it does not start and drive for a long distance without any issues. Just being able to start the engine does not make your vehicle operable.

Here are some of the more common examples of when a vehicle may technically be able to drive, but still would be considered inoperable for auto shipping.

  • Emergency Brake. A non-functioning emergency brake can mean your vehicle is an INOP, especially if your vehicle has a manual transmission.
  • Slipping Clutch. This will cause your vehicle to be considered INOP, due to the steep incline during the loading process.
  • Cooling Issues. Although you may be able to start the engine and let it run for a period of time without causing further mechanical issues, your vehicle will be considered INOP. Most drivers do not want to take the risk of overheating your car and causing further damage.

Be sure to explain the condition of your vehicle thoroughly. The information you provide will be used to ensure that a properly equipped carrier will be assigned to your shipment.

Can You Ship Wrecked Cars?

Shipping a wrecked car short distances is not an issue and will typically be shipped via a rollback. However, the types of carriers used for long distance automobile shipping are not specifically designed to haul wrecked vehicles. Depending on the specific condition of the wrecked vehicle, drivers do not typically want to combine wrecked vehicles with POVs on the same load. Combining wrecked vehicles with operable vehicles can result in damage due to leaking fluids or loose parts.

However, this does not mean it is always impossible to ship a wrecked vehicle across the country. If you are considering purchasing a wrecked automobile from an auto auction be sure to research the entire shipping process before you buy. There might be issues that you have not thought of. Copart auctions as an example will load your vehicle onto the car carrier using a very large forklift. Using this type of equipment to load your vehicle means that the carrier can put it where ever it is needed on the truck with no issues, even if the vehicle does not roll or steer. But, do you have the same type of forklift available at delivery? If the vehicle is unable to roll or steer you will need a forklift in order to unload the vehicle from the carrier. Without this, there might not be a way to unload and this could cause delays and additional fees.

 

If your vehicle is wrecked, we do require pictures showing all 4 corners of the vehicle and the wheels. Without these images, we will probably not provide you with a quote to ship your wrecked vehicle.

Can The Carrier Access Your INOP?

This question comes up commonly with classic and antique vehicles that are being purchased and shipped to be restored. We are car people, we love cars, and we can definitely see the potential in that old rusty car that has been sitting behind the barn for a decade or two. However much potential is there, it must first be moved. The carriers used to ship across the country are very large and unable to reach some locations. These large carriers will not travel down gravel or dirt roads and definitely will not go out behind the barn to dig a classic out of the ground. In some cases, you will need to meet the carrier in a large parking lot. If this is not something that you can arrange at both pickup and delivery, the services of one of our local affiliates may be necessary.

All inoperable vehicles need to be completely ready to transport before the carrier can be assigned.

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